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      VBS teaches youth about dangers of new drugs

      The Albany-Dougherty Drug Unit spoke to a vacation Bible school about dangers of drugs

      When asked how many of the kids at River Road Church of Christ's Vacation Bible School want to attend college, the room filled with dozens of raised hands.

      They were warned that drugs will not get them there; drugs send people to jail.

      Kids typically attend summer Vacation Bible Schools to learn more about their religion, but at this VBS, they are teaching kids about gangs and the dangers of drugs with the help of the Albany-Dougherty Drug Unit.

      "If they learn young, some of the consequences they're going to pay if they get involved in the drug trade, they can't use the excuse 'I didn't know,'" says ADDU Investigator Victor Camp.

      The Drug Unit says many kids have even already been exposed to drugs.

      "Some of them have seen it but it's not by choice but the biggest thing and the key we want to focus on is trying to make sure they don't get involved in the drug trade," says Camp.

      It is not the typical drugs like powdered cocaine that Camp says are becoming problems; he says bath salts and prescription drugs like Oxycodone are becoming the drugs of choice. Even a drug called "Crocodile" â" combining Codeine with other products like gasoline and paint thinner -- that is being sold online from Russia is becoming a threat.

      Antron Patton, VBS Coordinator, says his background as a police officer influenced him to have the Albany Dougherty Drug Unit visit at Vacation Bible School.

      "A growing issue in our community with kids seems to be using drugs younger and younger, and we want to make them aware and educate them on the dangers of drugs, hopefully deter them from ever using drugs," he says. "Drugs actually ruin families' lives and that affects the church so that's why I wanted to get the message out to our young people."

      Camp says he hopes the Drug Unit's message will not just affect those listening at VBS.

      "Hopefully that will carry on from them telling their friends 'Hey don't do this because this can happen to you,'' says Camp.

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