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Tracking Hurricane Irma

Around 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Irma made landfall at Marco Island as a category 3 hurricane. Irma is moving toward the north near 12 mph with maximum sustained winds near 120 mph. /NWS

Around 8:00 p.m. Sunday, Irma is moving toward the north near 14 mph with maximum sustained winds at 105 mph.

A north-northwestward motion with a further increase in forward speed is expected later Sunday, with that motion continuing through Monday. On the forecast track, the center of Irma should move near or over the southwest and west coast of the Florida Peninsula later today through tonight. Irma should then move inland over northern Florida and southwestern Georgia Monday afternoon. Irma's center is wobbling significantly off southwest Florida. Due to proximity to coast, landfall is possible anywhere from Naples to the Big Bend in Florida. No matter where landfall occurs, significant impacts should still be expected locally.

While weakening is forecast, Irma is expected to remain a powerful hurricane while it moves near or along the west coast of Florida.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 80 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 220 miles.

A 62 mph sustained wind and 99 mph gust was reported Sunday afternoon at the Federal Aviation Administration station at Miami International Airport. An 81 mph wind gust was reported at the Miami Weather Forecast Office/National Hurricane Center.

A Hurricane Warning has been issued for: Atkinson, Baker, Berrien, Brooks, Calhoun, Clay, Colquitt, Cook, Decatur, Dougherty, Early, Grady, Lanier, Lee, Lowndes, Miller, Mitchell, Randolph, Seminole, Terrell, Thomas, Tift, and Worth County until further notice. A Hurricane Warning means Hurricane wind conditions are expected somewhere within this area and within the next 36 hours.

A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for: Coffee, Crisp, Sumter, Ben Hill, Irwin, and Turner County until further notice. A Tropical Storm Warning means Tropical storm wind conditions are expected somewhere within this area and within the next 36 hours.

WIND: 30-40 mph sustained winds and 55 mph wind gusts can be expected across South Georgia Sunday night. During the day Monday, 50-70 mph sustained winds are expected with 85+ mph wind gusts. Monday night, winds calm down a little to 40-50 mph with gusts around 65 mph. The earliest reasonable time of arrival of Tropical Storm Force Winds is Sunday evening. Tropical Storm Force winds will taper off from south to north beginning late Monday afternoon and ending everywhere by midnight.

  • Emergency plans should include a reasonable threat for hurricane force wind of 74 to 110 mph of equivalent Category 1 to 2 intensity.
  • Expect extensive damage to trees and powerlines. The end result will likely look worse than Hermine. Prepare for widespread power outages lasting for a week or more.
  • To be safe, aggressively prepare for the potential of extensive wind impacts. Remaining efforts to secure properties should now be brought to completion.
  • Dangerous and life-threatening wind is possible. Failure to adequately shelter may result in serious injury or loss of life. Mobile homes significantly damaged, with many destroyed.Damage increased by large projectiles. Locations may be uninhabitable for days to weeks.Numerous large trees snapped or uprooted with roadway signs blown over.Some primary and many secondary roads are impassible due to debris.Significant power and communication outages; potentially lasting for weeksMajor damage to frame built homes, with some experiencing partial roof or wall collapse. Numerous windows and garage doors will fail, leading to additional structural damage.
  • Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous.

RAIN: Four to ten inches of rain is expected across South Georgia through Tuesday. Locally, most rain will occur late Sunday through Monday.

FLOODING: Only minor river flooding is expected at this time across South Georgia. Aggravations to these levels could occur under locally higher amounts. Flooding is possible in Southeast Georgia where higher rain totals are possible.

TORNADO THREAT: Tornado threat remains low. The Storm Prediction Center has a Marginal Risk for areas along and east of Interstate 75. If tornadoes occur, they will be brief and possibly rain-wrapped.

Tropical storm conditions are essentially certain for much of the region. Hurricane conditions are most likely across south-central Georgia.

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