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      Knock Knock: How police track down sex offenders

      FOX 31 is learning more about the requirements of convicted sex offenders and how a local sheriff's office is making sure offenders are living where they say they are.

      That includes deputies knowing where they're living and what kinds of cars they're driving.

      "We do everything possible to make sure that the sex offenders are accounted for and what they tell us is accurate and if they don't adhere to it, they are arrested," Sergeant Ben Bray with the Crisp County Sheriff's Office said.

      The sheriff's office expects frequent calls from the offenders. If you're homeless, you're expected to call each night with your exact location and if you leave for vacation, you are required to let them know where.

      "That also depends on your offense date, when it occurred, to what requirements you are to adhere to," Bray said.

      Some offenders aren't allowed near schools, churches and other public places. That's only if convicted after June 4, 2003.

      In Crisp County, Jason Gourley is the man who follows up to make sure people are living where they say they're living which they must do within 72 hours after the sex offender's release from prison or after moving to the county.

      "Once they're finished registering, an address verification will be given to me," Gourley said. "I will then go out to their house, attempt to make contact with them. If they're there, I will verify all the information they gave us."

      Sometimes they aren't home but deputies expect a quick response within 24 hours of that visit.

      "If they're not there, I'll leave a door knocker on their door," Gourley said. "A little message saying hey, you need to give us a call, we need to talk."

      The public can see where sex offenders are living in their neighborhood any time by going to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation's website. There you'll find a map county-by-county that's updated each month.