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      How the shutdown is being seen locally

      As of midnight on October 1st, the federal government shut down after congress couldn't reach an agreement on a national budget, and those in Southwest Georgia are seeing some of its effects / File


      As of midnight on October 1st, the federal government shut down after congress couldn't reach an agreement on a national budget, and those in Southwest Georgia are seeing some of its effects.

      After a ring or two, callers trying to reach the Andersonville National Historic Site are met with a message claiming the park will reopen when the government does.

      Though it seems like a prank fitting for the month of October, national parks aren't the only ones forced to tell employees they're not able to come to work effective immediately after congress could not come to an agreement on the nation's budget.

      "Our civilian-marines and base employees began being furloughed, we're continuing to keep the faith here in hopes that the legislation comes through with a decision and brings our working family here back to work," said Captain Justin Jacobs with the Marine Corps Logistics Base Public Affairs office.

      While MCLB released a breakdown of exactly what departments would be downsized or closed, others like the Social Security Office, Post Office and most branches of the federally funded Head Start education program are happy to announce their doors will stay open.

      Congressman Sanford Bishop released a statement stressing the repercussions of the shutdown, whether it be directly or through a trickledown effect saying,

      "Everyday Americans employed with the Federal Government will be met with hardship at work and at home. Rent, taxes, mortgages, children's tuition, food and travel all will be impacted as paychecks are delayed. As hundreds of thousands of employees wait for their pay, local economies and communities will feel the brunt of Congress' failure to pass a funding bill."

      Officials say the situation will worsen each day that an agreement isn't reached, though when one finally is made they could work out some of the damage done during the shutdown.

      "The employees who've had to work will be reimbursed for their time. Now it'll have to be within the budget negotiations as to whether those who've been furloughed will be paid," said Georgia Representative Carol Fullerton.

      The shutdown will continue until the house and senate make a deal, but many representatives have hopes that the two parties will realize the importance of compromise before any irreparable damage is done.

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