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      Eight men sentenced on cocaine charges


      Eight Southwest Georgians are sentenced for drug-related charges, announces James U.S. Attorney Michael Moore, Middle District of Georgia.

      James Corshoray Willis, 35, from Moultrie is sentenced to 80 months in the Bureau of Prisons followed by three years of supervised release for distribution of cocaine. A press release says Willis sold cocaine to a confidential informant on multiple occasions in 2010, adding the amount of drugs was at least 500 grams.

      Willis' sentence is ordered to be consecutive to sentences imposed for violating terms of his earlier parole in a Henry County Superior Court Case for possession of cocaine with intent to distribute and in a Colquitt County Superior Court case for possession of ecstasy.

      William McKeithen, 42, from Valdosta is sentenced to 209 months in the Bureau of Prisons after pleading guilty to distribution of cocaine. In 2010, authorities say a search of a vehicle driven by McKeithen revealed 998.7 grams of cocaine. His prison sentence will be followed by five years of supervised release.

      McKeithen is labeled as a "career offender" in the press release, citing his prior 1990 conviction of third degree murder in Dade County, Florida, and a 2001 conviction for distribution of crack cocaine in Valdosta.

      David Laster, 41, from Ocilla is sentenced to 120 months in the Bureau of Prisons followed by eight years of supervised release for distribution of crack cocaine. The press release states Laster sold a total of 128.8 grams of crack cocaine to a confidential informant. His sentenced is enhanced based on 1991 and 1998 convictions for sale of cocaine in Irwin County.

      Curtis Lee Williams, 31, from Lakeland is sentenced to 60 months in the Bureau of Prisons and four years of supervised release for distribution of crack cocaine. Officials say from 2009 to 2012, he sold crack cocaine to a confidential informant and that authorities found 87,69 grams of crack cocaine and 132.69 grams of cocaine in his vehicle.

      Peter Thornton, 39, from Moultrie is sentenced to 188 months in the Bureau of Prisons and five years of supervised release for possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine. The press release says Thornton possessed crack and powder cocaine with intentions to distribute them and sold cocaine to a confidential informant; officials say Thornton had 109 grams of crack cocaine and 337 grams of powder cocaine.

      Thornton is categorized by officials as a "career offender" based on a 1990 conviction for sale of cocaine in Colquitt County and a conviction for kidnapping in Colquitt County.

      Justin Barron, 30, from Valdosta is sentenced to 135 months in the Bureau of Prisons followed by supervised release for five years for possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine. Authorities say Barron admitted to selling crack cocaine and powder cocaine to a confidential informant; they say he's responsible for at least 28 grams but no more than 112 grams of crack cocaine.

      Corey Miller, 29, from Lakeland is sentenced to 151 months in the Bureau of Prisons followed by three years of supervised release for possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine. Officials say Miller admitted to selling crack cocaine to a confidential informant on multiple occasions, adding he was responsible for 43 grams of crack cocaine.

      Authorities categorize Miller as a "career offender" based on 2001 and 2003 convictions for sale of cocaine in Lanier County.

      Johnny Locklear, 45, from Lakeland â" also identified in the press release as the co-defendant and brother of Miller â" is sentenced to six months in the Bureau of Prisons for Possession with Intent to distribute crack cocaine. Authorities say Locklear admitted to delivering cocaine in 2012 to a confidential informant by Miller's direction.

      "I appreciate the cooperative efforts of our state, local and federal partners as we work together to take drug dealers off of our streets and out of our neighborhoods and put them in federal prison for a good, long time," says Moore.

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