MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Driving green around Albany

Tune in tonight at 10 and the rest of the week to find out why switching from traditional fossil fuels to alternative energy is not only better for the environment, it's also still cost effective despite the lack of government assistance. / File


You've probably already heard about Georgia House Bill 170 which became effective July 1.

It did away with the $5000 tax credit for owners people that drive electric vehicles and imposes a $200 registration fee for the vehicles.

Although this new bill is expected to generate an average of $840 million per year for the state, it's also expected to slow the already drawn-out transition to alternative fuel sources.

Despite or perhaps in spite of this push back, regional and local leaders are doing their part to ensure the future of energy in Southwest Georgia.

"We need to learn as much as we can about how we can bring our city into the fore front of the cutting-edge changes in renewable energy," said Albany Mayor Dorothy Hubbard.

That's why every summer, Albany hosts the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Roadshow.

Attendees were able to look into the future of transportation and renewable energy with increasingly popular accommodations like solar powered charging stations, compressed natural gas vehicles, propane, propane accessories and much more.

Tune in tonight at 10 and the rest of the week to find out why switching from traditional fossil fuels to alternative energy is not only better for the environment, it's also still cost effective despite the lack of government assistance.

Trending